the purple light of a summer night in spain
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About: Adventure is worthwhile in itself.

pixalry:

Middle Earth Travel Posters - Created by The Green Dragon Inn

Prints are available for sale on Etsy.

(via mizz-destiny)

fuckyeahsansastark:

Why Sansa Stark Is the Strongest Character on ‘Game of Thrones’ by Julianne Ross

Sansa is totally the reader/audience surrogate in this series - let’s face it, most of us would be as clueless as her. She learns to navigate the world to the best of her abilities, seeking her (admittedly storybook) ideals, through messing up and getting in over her head. And don’t even get me started on the Sansa and Brienne “I love tales of chivalry” parallels.

(via cleolinda)

“I do not think I ever opened a book in my life which had not something to say upon woman’s inconstancy. Songs and proverbs, all talk of woman’s fickleness. But perhaps you will say, these were all written by men.

Perhaps I shall. Yes, yes, if you please, no reference to examples in books. Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands. I will not allow books to prove anything.”
—Austen, Jane. Persuasion. (via wordsnquotes)

(via ilovejaneausten)

twinpeakscaptioned:

yes yes y’all twin peaks is getting some good old fashioned buzzfeed love. 

twinpeakscaptioned:

yes yes y’all twin peaks is getting some good old fashioned buzzfeed love. 

bookmania:

Jane Austen (Authors Series) by Ryan Sheffield

bookmania:

Jane Austen (Authors Series) by Ryan Sheffield

(via typographie)

cumaeansibyl:

this is legit btw
I mean, there were folkloric heroes like Robin Hood before the Scarlet Pimpernel, but they didn’t really do the secret identity — people might not have known Robin Hood’s real identity but he wasn’t out living a double life and his costume was just what he and his buds wore in the forest, whereas the Pimpernel was actually doing the exact same thing as Bruce Wayne (pampered aristocrat by day, avenging hero by night)
also I wanna point out that the Scarlet Pimpernel was actually the leader of a league of twenty people also living double lives — Baroness Orczy also invented the first superhero team

cumaeansibyl:

this is legit btw

I mean, there were folkloric heroes like Robin Hood before the Scarlet Pimpernel, but they didn’t really do the secret identity — people might not have known Robin Hood’s real identity but he wasn’t out living a double life and his costume was just what he and his buds wore in the forest, whereas the Pimpernel was actually doing the exact same thing as Bruce Wayne (pampered aristocrat by day, avenging hero by night)

also I wanna point out that the Scarlet Pimpernel was actually the leader of a league of twenty people also living double lives — Baroness Orczy also invented the first superhero team

(Source: geekmehard, via fytortall)

the-library-and-step-on-it:

LITERATURE MEME:
Six Prose Writers: Charlotte Brontë (6/6).

You advise me, too, not to stray far from the ground of experience, as I become weak when I enter the region of fiction; and you say, “real experience is perennially interesting, and to all men.”
I feel that this also is true; but, dear Sir, is not the real experience of each individual very limited? And, if a writer dwells upon that solely or principally, is he not in danger of repeating himself, and also of becoming an egotist? Then, too, imagination is a strong, restless faculty, which claims to be heard and exercised: are we to be quite deaf to her cry, and insensate to her struggles? When she shows us bright pictures, are we never to look at them, and try to reproduce them? And when she is eloquent, and speaks rapidly and urgently in our ear, are we not to write to her dictation?

the-library-and-step-on-it:

LITERATURE MEME:

Six Prose Writers: Charlotte Brontë (6/6).

You advise me, too, not to stray far from the ground of experience, as I become weak when I enter the region of fiction; and you say, “real experience is perennially interesting, and to all men.”

I feel that this also is true; but, dear Sir, is not the real experience of each individual very limited? And, if a writer dwells upon that solely or principally, is he not in danger of repeating himself, and also of becoming an egotist? Then, too, imagination is a strong, restless faculty, which claims to be heard and exercised: are we to be quite deaf to her cry, and insensate to her struggles? When she shows us bright pictures, are we never to look at them, and try to reproduce them? And when she is eloquent, and speaks rapidly and urgently in our ear, are we not to write to her dictation?

(via thebrontes)

“I think Natalie Portman said something brilliant about modern-day female action heroes, about how even though they’re strong you need to also see the messiness of everyday life, that complexity. Even with Peggy Carter… Can we see her have a really shit day, put her pyjamas on and eat loads of ice cream and weep into chick flick? Can we have her be neurotic, hysterical, funny, depressed and all those things that we all relate to that aren’t regularly depicted because they’re not seen as sexy or comfortable for men to watch and masturbate over?”

Hayley Atwell, on Why female action heroes are more than fodder for male fantasies. (via peggyleads)

We need our female heroes to be as real as possible so we know we can be heroic, too, each in our own way. 

(via tamorapierce)

(Source: fuckyeahagentcarter, via tamorapierce)

“Mistresses, have you ever noticed that when we disagree with males-I hesitate to say ‘men’-or find ourselves in a position over males, the first comment they make is always about our reputations or our monthlies?” —Lady Knight Keladry of Mindelan, Protector of the Small  (via eternalsummernights)

(via fytortall)

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